Employment Standards Act

HR Resource
November 26, 2012 — 1,989 views  
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Employment Standards Act

There are minimum standards of operation for each employee and employer, and today's human resources market. Several of the minimum procedures that must be followed for each employee are described in the employment standards act. The workplace has various procedures for termination, wage and hour laws, and leave issues for the citizens of Canada. The following are these standards.

1. Termination procedures are focused on the employee's right to terminate a job and the employer's right to terminate the employee. There are responsibilities, however, that cannot be left out of any termination. Usually, there needs to be a notice sent out to the employee that indicates that a termination will take place. Often, this type of intent to terminate will allow the employee to respond to such a critical issue. The employee, also, has the right to leave, without notice, any job that is unhealthy or dangerous, if the individual continues to work there. An employee may file a complaint if any employment rules have been breached. There are additional rules that apply, if the business has been sold or there has been a temporary lay-off of employees. The construction industry has a separate manner of operation for the employees, who are a part of the construction sector.

2. Wage and hour laws are involved in the period of time, when the employee works for an employer. These wage and hour laws include time off with pay requirements. The employee is entitled to a rest period, after each five-hour shift. A rest day may be required, for each week of work with an employer. An employee may work up to 12 hours a day.

3. Leave issues may arise if there is a new child born, or a child adopted. The parents are allowed to have either a maternity leave, after the child birth, or a parental leave. A parental leave can occur for the father of the new born or for either parent of an adopted child. Maternity leave can last as long as 52 consecutive weeks, for the newborn's mother. This type of work leave is without pay, however, the security of the job, after the maternity leave, is a modern employee requirement. Both parents can take a portion of the parental leave, or just one of the parents can take the entire leave duration.

Conclusion


Modern employment standards include notice of termination and the right to file a complaint against this, controlled wage and hour requirements, and mandatory parental rights for employees. Human resource managers are frequently addressing these modern labor standards.

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