Vocational School Research Strategies

Jamie Charter
February 20, 2008 — 1,958 views  
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Are you or someone in your workplace considering making a career change, upgrading skills or attending school? Do you have a career bound family member? How do you go about identifying an appropriate training facility? What are some key components to look for and what questions would you want to ask if and when you decide to go on a tour? This article will provide you with those answers! IDENTIFYING VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS How do you go about finding vocational schools? Many vocational schools are advertised in the yellow pages, on daytime television, in local news publications and on the Internet. You can call the school and request a catalogue of their classes. You can call the ones that interest you and ask questions on the phone, before you set a tour. What are the hours of training? Attendance policy? Refund policy in case the training does not work out? How long is the training program and how often does the training start? If you were ready to start, you would not want to consider a school that did not have a start date for too far off into the future. Find out the location of the school and get some good directions if you plan to visit and arrange a tour later on. Knowing where you live and the drive to and from school, is it reasonable for you to get there on time when it starts every day? What is the traffic like? If you do not drive, you would want to find out: Is the school accessible to public transportation? Is carpooling available? What kind of licensing or accreditation does the school have? This differs from state to state and is important to know, to make sure the program meets standards of competency. If the school interests you, ask if they can send you a catalogue. This will give you the chance to review the courses and you can then decide if you want to visit the school. Also, you can collect materials from all of the schools you call and then compare programs. Later, if you decide to go on a tour, you can then ask more questions after reading through the materials. If you have had a work related or other type of injury or disability, it is very important to ask questions about what is involved physically in the coursework and then out in the job market. Many of the vocational schools are used to working with people who have had some type of injury or disability. Can this school accommodate you and any special needs you may have? If all of the above interests you, you can let the school know that after you review the brochure and materials they send you, you will call them back for a tour. Jamie Charter, consultant, trainer and author, has been providing employment and litigation consulting services for 24 years through Charter and Company employment resource consultants in Soquel, California. Areas of specialization include development and implementation of disability management programs, case management, conflict resolution, EEOC/FEHA/ADA consultation, return-to-work facilitation, essential functions , job analyses, conducting training seminars for employer groups on sexual harassment prevention and discrimination and litigation /expert witness services in Forensics.

Jamie Charter

Charter and Company

Jamie Charter, consultant, trainer and author, has been providing employment and litigation consulting services for 23 years through Charter and Company employment resource consultants in Soquel, California. Areas of specialization include development and implementation of disability management programs, case management, EEOC/FEHA/ADA consultation, return-to-work facilitation, CalPers job description services, job analyses, conducting training seminars for employer groups on sexual harassment prevention and discrimination and litigation /expert witness services in Forensics.